Ben Whybrow

I’m an actor who trained at Bristol University and then LAMDA. I now live in Totterdown and I’m seeking to make work in Bristol. Recent theatre credits include the original cast of Sleep No More, Shanghai (Punchdrunk International), the world premiere of This Will End Badly by Rob Hayes (Pleasance Courtyard/Southwark Playhouse), Conrad Scherer and Jasper Tuttle in The Drowned Man (Punchdrunk/NT), and The Winter’s Tale directed by Lucy Bailey (RSC).
As a theatre maker and deviser I’m a collaborator with Mark Arends’ award winning company Make Mend and Do who make innovative work for young people and grown ups (Something Very Far Away/At The End Of Everything Else Unicorn/NT Studio). Our work has been seen all over the UK, Europe and Melbourne International Festival.

I trained at LAMDA and Bristol University.

Currently:   January 2018 – just returned to the UK after 14 months in Shanghai, originating the role of The Groom and playing Malcolm in Punchdrunk’s Sleep No More.

Recent theatre credits include:  Original cast of Sleep No More – Shanghai (Punchdrunk International), the world premiere of the one man show This Will End Badly by Rob Hayes (Pleasance Courtyard and Southwark Playhouse), Conrad Scherer and Jasper Tuttle in The Drowned Man (Punchdrunk/NT), The Winter’s Tale directed by Lucy Bailey (RSC), the world premiere of Dead On Her Feet by Ron Hutchinson (Arcola), a Trevor Griffiths double bill of All Good Men and Thermidor (Finborough) and Polixenes and Florizel in an abridged version of The Winter’s Tale (Orange Tree Theatre).

Film includes Tube Tube and most recently Orsino in a forthcoming version of Twelfth Night. Radio includes The Archers.

As a theatre maker and deviser I’m a collaborator with Mark Arends’ company Make Mend and Do who make innovative work for young people and grown ups. Something Very Far Away at the Unicorn Theatre/NT Studio won the Off West End Award for best show for young people in 2013 and has since toured internationally to Imaginate Festival in Edinburgh, Paris, Singapore and Melbourne International Festival. Our second production, At The End Of Everything Else, continues to tour.  http://www.makemendanddo.com

After 7 years in London, I moved back to Bristol and I’m actively looking to make work and collaborate in Bristol and the South West.

My CV can be found here: http://www.spotlight.com/interactive/cv/9377-0166-6731

Showreel: https://vimeo.com/145131265

For THIS WILL END BADLY:

“This was perhaps the best show I’ve seen this year… I urge you to see it. Dazzling.”
The Observer ★★★★★

The emotional truth of Hayes’s writing, in all its vivid eloquence, has a paradoxical effect: it both glorifies masculinity and assaults it at one and same time. Spasms of humour make the excruciatingly frayed nerves of the situations easier to bear, and Whybrow delivers the performance of a lifetime.  Clive Judd’s production, designed by Jemima Robinson, with its platform stage and its sole white toilet allows Whybrow to prowl the intimate space with a command of the rapid-fire monologue that is simply transfixing. He fields three different characters, changing accent and posture for each one with mind-boggling speed and intensity. He talks directly to individual audience members, especially women in his Meat Cute persona. There is danger, there is discomfort, there is an inner feeling of delirium. By the end, as the foam flecks his lips, a suggestion of cure and of redemption lifts the spirits as this superbly bold and dark 60-minute masterpiece does a handbrake turn and squeals to a surprising halt. Aleks Sierz – The Arts Desk ★★★★

“Ben Whybrow is heartrending, callous and funny by turns. It’s as unsettling and brilliant a performance as you’re likely to see this year.”
Fest Magazine ★★★★

“An intense, exhausting performance complements this diagnosis of emotional obsession in the modern male”
The Stage ★★★★

“In a tour de force of tragicomic agitation and deep-seated despair, Ben Whybrow hops between- and seamlessly communicates the essence of – all three of these driven characters whose interwoven monologues form the substance of the drama”  The Independent ★★★★

“The show is a stark and dazzling examination of the tortured male soul, and it has so much eloquent potency that the writer, Rob Hayes, must wonder why it hasn’t leapt immediately into the realm of international popularity.  Ben Whybrow gives a virtuoso display in the three roles. The show runs for just over an hour but the script would consume 150 minutes of stage-time if enacted at newsreader speed. It’s a monumental feat of memory and performance by a sensational talent.”  The Spectator