Tribe of Doris

Contact

Tel: 0117 318 1549,
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Website: https://www.tribeofdoris.co.uk/ (opens in new tab)
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Tribe of Doris is a social enterprise promoting cross-cultural cohesion and education through creativity, dance, song and ceremony. Based in Bristol, Tribe of Doris connects local, national, and international creative practitioners to new audiences and communities. Tribe of Doris works to promote diversity, preserving heritage and forging new relationships across generations, genres and geography. Our aim is to unite separate communities; promote and support diverse artists; influence the local and national Cultural Arts Agenda’s and programming to include the rich and unexplored talents of the World’s Ethnic Groups in the UK and beyond. Doris also works to support women and youth and people from grassroots communities to be better represented. Through community events, gatherings and the annual Tribe of Doris Festival, we communicate our love of diversity and culture.

Tribe of Doris Festival 7 – 11 Aug 2019

Tribe of Doris Festival 2019 offers over 200 workshops including with world-class arts practitioners in the grounds of Stanford Hall in Lutterworth, Leicestershire LE17 6DH

Unlike most festivals, Tribe of Doris is not about passive consumption of the arts but active participation. Festival-goers can take part in over 200 arts workshops including drumming, singing and dancing.

Dance workshops this year include Guinean dance, Orixa dance movement, flamenco, street dance, Cuban salsa and Bollywood. Children and youth have their own workshops including flamenco for kids with Elena and Karina (left).

 

Drumming workshops include Mandeng rhythms, sabar drumming, tabla and Indian percussion, gong bath and drum circles.

Zimbabwean Song & M’bira with Cecilia Ndlovu-EdwardsCecilia Ndlovu-Edwards

Also song workshops from Latin America, Zimbabwe (left: Zimbabwean Song & M’bira with Cecilia Ndlovu-Edwards), Brazil, and the British Isles.

All of which culminate in an evening of performance on the Saturday night under canvas and starlight.

Every night of the festival, campfires are lit and people gather to talk, laugh, play music and sing.

Spontaneous spectacles in front of flickering flames feels ancestral – this is how human have entertained each other for thousands of years.

There is also a healing area and a sauna on the fields, and children and youth have their own area with workshops. Food stalls are plenty and on Friday night, there is a (ticketed) tribal feast in Stanford Hall.

Bring your own tent (included in price) otherwise yurts and glamping are available as well as a coach from Bristol.

The festival begins with an opening ceremony and ends with a closing one, bringing ritual and ceremony into everyday experience.

Why Doris? The name was a cheeky idea from Bristol-based co-founders, Deasy Bamford and Siobhan Kierans, who founded the festival in 1990: “Even your auntie Doris would like to come.”.

Whether you want to refine a passion for an art or discover a new one, Tribe of Doris is a welcoming people-friendly community, and a feast for the artistic senses.